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October 26

This concert, featuring three exceptional works for string quartet, will explore the extent to which Haydn, Beethoven and Schubert, whose lives overlapped in Vienna at the turn of the nineteenth century, were kindred spirits. Schubert’s Quartettsatz, the first movement of an unfinished quartet, contains an achingly beautiful...

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October 26 Haydn - String Quartet in G major, Op. 54 No. 1Beethoven- String Quartet No. 12 in E flat major, Op. 127Schubert - Quartettsatz in C minor, D703                                                                  LEARN MORENovember 16 Beethoven - Violin Sonata No. 9 in A major, Op. 47 Kreutzer SonataTchaikovsky- String Quartet No. 1 in D major, Op. 11 (2nd movement)Janáček - String Quartet No. 1 Kreutzer Sonata                                                                 LEARN MORE

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The Endellion String Quartet

Illustrated talk by David Waterman

October 26

Haydn String Quartet in G major, Op. 54 No. 1

Beethoven String Quartet No. 12 in E flat major, Op. 127

Schubert Quartettsatz in C minor, D703

This concert, featuring three exceptional works for string quartet, will explore the extent to which Haydn, Beethoven and Schubert, whose lives overlapped in Vienna at the turn of the nineteenth century, were kindred spirits. Schubert’s Quartettsatz, the first movement of an unfinished quartet, contains an achingly beautiful melody set off by an underlying sense of fear and tragedy. By contrast, Haydn’s G major Quartet, Op. 54 No. 1 reveals its composer at his most good-natured and genial, while also embracing a slow movement of searching profundity. Beethoven’s Op. 127 is a work of radiance and lyricism whose second-movement variations encompass everything from playfulness to prayer.

Ignat Solzhenitsyn piano

Mark Steinberg violin

Ariel Quartet

Illustrated talk by Ignat Solzhenitsyn

November 16

Beethoven - Violin Sonata No. 9 in A major, Op. 47 Kreutzer Sonata

Tchaikovsky- String Quartet No. 1 in D major, Op. 11 (2nd movement)

Janáček - String Quartet No. 1 Kreutzer Sonata

Beethoven’s "Kreutzer Sonata" for violin and piano (dedicated to Rodolphe Kreutzer, a French violinist who never performed it) is the centerpiece of Tolstoy’s disturbing and controversial novel, "The Kreutzer Sonata." The novel in turn inspired the Czech composer, Leos Janáček, to write his eponymous, intense and feverish first string quartet.

 

Tolstoy, deeply responsive to music, had a particular passion for folk music (the second movement of Tchaikovsky’s first quartet, based on a folk song from Tolstoy’s childhood, brought tears to his eyes). However, he was highly selective about the works of Western composers. While Tolstoy admired Beethoven and was captivated by his music, he was also of the view that the composer had brought about the decline of musical art.

 

In "The Kreutzer Sonata", Tolstoy expresses his complex and controversial views on marriage and sexuality, focusing on the conflict between the main character, Pozdnyshev, and his unnamed wife, who plays Beethoven’s sonata with a spirited violinist. While she becomes impassioned by the music, Pozdnyshev, believing himself deceived, is overcome by a jealous rage and murders his wife.

 

The musical narrative of Janáček’s String Quartet No. 1, "Kreutzer Sonata", seems to mirror the unfolding marital tragedy of Tolstoy's novel, while the third movement of the quartet is modelled on the second theme of Beethoven’s "Kreutzer Sonata."

 

Join us as we explore the unique connections between music and literature, and witness music become, in Tolstoy’s words, "a shorthand of feelings."